Okay ... by other peoples' standards, it's not that cold. But they aren't here to experience it firsthand.We're Texans, and this cold is causing all sorts of unforeseen issues in my daily routine. First of all, it's a wet cold. The humidity last night was around 70%. It had rained during the day, and then dropped down to freezing at 30 degrees or less. So far still at 50 percent humidity.

But what happens to us inside our homes is the bigger issue. No one in Texas really has a humidifier hooked up to the AC. It's just not something that we need very often. Like no AC in cars up north in Michigan. They really are just an option. Very rarely would you ever use them.

So we all get in the house, turn on the heat, and even though the humidity is high, our heater takes it all out. It could get down to 30% humidity in your house running the heater, even if it was 50% outside. That's what causes your cracked hands, cold even though it's warm, nosebleeds, shivers, and this could be due to excessive TV binge watching under piles of covers.

I bought a whole house humidifier this year. It was about $70 and covers up to 3,000 square feet. I try to keep it 50% in the house, and at least over 43%. I have found that if the house is 71 degrees at 50% humidity, I am comfortable. But my electricity bill has doubled over the winter. I get a lower bill, from running the AC.

At least I am comfortable. Partly because, I got a quartz heater, that supposedly doesn't take as much humidity out of the air. I use that for those times that I just can't get warm in the house, and it's been working pretty well. About another $80 at Wal-Mart. So this winter has gotten a little expensive. But I will be prepared for next year.

How do you cope in the cold? Do you run the electric heater built in to your AC, use little gas heaters, or do you have a furnace? Do you get under blankets, or just eat hot foods? Let us know in the comments below, and I'll keep you posted about how I stay humid.