So, have you enjoyed a klobasnek (kloh bah schneck)for breakfast in the past week? Or maybe you were really hungry and had klobasniky (pronounced kloh bah schnicky).

You say you have no idea what those food items are?  I bet you do. It's what you see in the picture above.  But, aren't those kolaches?  Well...check out the menu board of most any donut or pastry store in East Texas or beyond, and yes, those pastries stuffed with an elongated sausage have been named and embraced as a kolache.

But, it's not really a kolache.

I guess it kind of falls under the same category in Texas that no matter what brand of soda water your drink, it's a Coke.  But, if you're a purist or if you just want to know the true Czech background of what a kolache TRULY is...read on.

Photo contributed by Jack Matusek

First, on the left is a kolac, or a kolache; on the right are kolaches.

I had the chance to have a conversation with Jack Matusek on the air Tuesday morning.  He has a deep Czech background and is from Shiner, Texas (you don't get much more Czech than that), and he explained to me, as well as on a web site blog, that "a true kolac is a circular, pillow-like, puff pastry with a small dimple in the middle, occupied by a fruit compote or sweet cheese filling."

A klobasnek (singular) or klobasniky (plural) are the pigs in a blanket or sausage kolaches that no one can pronounce or for that matter, has even heard of.

So as you can see in the video, even the store operators have never heard of a klobasnek, or for that matter, don't know what a true kolache is.  That's fine...pigs in a blanket are pretty darn tasty no matter what they're called. But, I would like to put this question out there:

Is there any place in Deep East Texas that serves a delicious, true Czech kolache?  Let me know.

Schlitterbahn bonus word:  breakfast