Two weeks.

We're only two weeks away from the beginning of archery-only deer season in the State of Texas, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) has some good news to share when it comes to deer population in the Lone Star State.

TPWD biologists say that 2021-22 is expected to be a white-tailed deer season for the books.  Last year, the overall white-tailed deer population was estimated at 5.4 million deer.  That number was still down from the previous two years, however, biologists say that if fawn recruitment predictions hold true this season, coupled with good carryover of deer from last hunting season, hunters and landowners can expect to see an increase in the overall statewide white-tailed deer populations.

The plentiful rain of the late spring across the natural habitats of white-tailed deer has greatly increased the production for forb, grass and woody plant production.  This has acted as a natural buffet for deer.  Alan Cain, TPWD White-Tailed Deer Program Leader says that the favorable habitat conditions should boost the body condition of deer populations and set up deer to enter the fall and winter with a substantial layer of fat.  Antler quality is predicated to be well above average for the 2021-22 season.

Archery-only season kicks off the first week of October, while the general season starts November 6 and runs through January 2, 2022 in the North Zone and through January 16, 2022 in the South Zone.  A special youth-only gun deer season is set for October 30-31 and again January 3-16, 2022.

Those interested in learning more about archery and bowhunting are encouraged to check out Bowhunter by Fall, a newsletter series presented by TPWD's Community Archery Program.

Make sure you listen to KICKS 105 and download our free KICKS 105 App because we will soon be revealing the details on this season's Deer Hunter's Dream Giveaway.

Get our free mobile app

RANKED: Here are the most popular national parks

To determine the most popular national parks in the United States, Stacker compiled data from the National Park Service on the number of recreational visits each site had in 2020. Keep reading to discover the 50 most popular national parks in the United States, in reverse order from #50 to #1. And be sure to check with individuals parks before you visit to find out about ongoing, pandemic-related safety precautions at www.nps.gov/coronavirus.